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    7.6 of 10 on the basis of 3441 Review.
     

     

     

     

     

     

         
     

    Seo And Usability

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    Usability is a key term that you, as a search engine optimizer, will be hearing more of lately. In essence it means the ability of an entity to complete a function once it is started. How does this apply to SEO? Essentially if you brag that your site promises “SEO guru help” and individuals who log in there don’t see any help at all but only affiliate links to other sites with gurus then Google and the other big engines may not see your site as having usability. The more technology progresses it seems the more that marketing types will now be obligated to fulfill the promises that they make with their keywords. Google, the pioneer when it comes to developing the search engine page ranking algorithms that other search engines use, has now switched its focus to looking at how people find information and what they do when they access a document found in the Google index. Google now has ways of determining how long people look at your web pages, if they like to explore your links to both your archives and outside sites and the relevance of your documents to any keywords that you have submitted. Google also measures the amount of times your website is put into "My Favorites" in Internet Explorer. The more people that put your website into their favorites, the more Google will like your website and thus in turn push it up the Search Engine Results. Yet another component of usability is your website’s functionality. If it does not work, Google and other big sites simply may not bother to list it. As the search engine spiders are constantly crawling millions of sites it could take years for a spider to crawl your site for a second time so you need to get it right before you make your website live!



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    8 Guidelines For Usability Testing

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    In professional web design circles, the usability testing session has become an essential component of any major project. Similar to focus groups in brand development and product launches, usability testing offers a rare opportunity to receive feedback from the very people the website is aimed at before it's too late to do anything about it. But how can you get the most from these usability testing sessions? 1. Choosing Your Subjects As with any market research project, the results will only be as good as the people you test. Do not test people from your own company, or friends and family. Go to a market research firm or temp agency and ask them to source participants to a certain profile. Make sure the market research firm does not provide the name of the company or any other details that will cloud the judgement of the participants. 2. Before The Usability Testing As with everything in life, first impressions are vital. Each participant must be put at ease. Remember, the usability testing session is often an extremely artificial environment and, for the most beneficial and informative results, we want them to behave as if they were using the site at home or work. Provide clear instructions on how to get to the usability testing location, and if necessary meet the participants at local stations. Do not use terms such as ‘usability testing’ or ‘market research’, as these can confuse and put people on edge. Also, ensure that participants know how long the usability testing will take, and the type of tasks they will be expected to perform. After the initial greeting and welcoming drinks, there are always legal forms that must be signed. It is essential that these are written in plain English, and are as short as possible. The last thing any nervous usability testing subject wants is to be given a contract that looks like they're signing their soul away. All you want is for them to be reassured that the tests are completely confidential, and for permission to use the data generated during the test as part of our results. So tell them that. 3. Beginning The Usability Testing Before diving into key tasks, get the user familiar with the environment. Tell them the website's name and URL, and ask them for initial feedback on what they would expect from the site or what they would like the site to be. Make note of any terms or phrases they use this not only demonstrates you are taking their feedback seriously, but may provide useful tips as to possible labels for key functionality or navigation. Next, let them look at the website they are testing. Gauge their first impressions before allowing them to familiarise themselves with the site. These few simple tasks will help convince the participant that the usability testing will not be difficult and, perhaps most importantly, that they're not the ones being tested. 4. Choosing Tasks Set tasks that are essential to the new site's success, such as: Buying products Paying bills Contacting the client Remember, you're not looking for an ego massage. The site was built for a reason can your target audience do what you need them to do? It's also a good idea to ask the user to suggest tasks. While this gives another indication of their expectations and requirements, it may suggest new functionality or priorities. 5. How To Word Tasks People tend to perform more naturally if you provide them with scenarios rather than instructions. When giving them tasks, you should use phrases like ‘Scenario A has occurred, and you need to ring the company urgently find the telephone number’. This is far better than ‘find the contact us section of the site’. 6. Presenting Tasks Only give participants one task at a time. More than this may intimidate them, or alter their approach to the test. If the user is required to use inputs from outside the test (e. g. an email giving them a password to the site), give them these inputs in the form they will be presented. This will provide useful feedback on all elements of the process, rather than simply the site. 7. How To Behave During The Usability Testing It's essential that you remember that it's the website that is being tested, not you or the subject. Any feedback you get is valuable make sure the participant knows this. If they can't do something, make sure they know it's not their fault. You must stay quiet and out of sight during the test. You must not alter the test results by providing clues, suggesting directions or by reacting to things they say or do. All feedback you give must be neutral. Do not start shaking your head or huffing, however tempting it might be! The only time you should speak is to help the participant give an opinion, or to clarify a response. If in doubt, shut up! Given the investment made in the project, clients often find it difficult to be quiet during tests. If your client wants to be present, put them in another room with an audio/video link. 8. After The Usability Testing After all the tasks have been completed, you should gather as much information as possible. Asking for overall impressions of the site will allow you to judge whether expectations have been met, and whether the participant's view of the client or site has changed during the process. Always ask for suggestions this not only demonstrates the value you place on their thoughts, but may provide insights into how the site can better support the user. Finally, ask the participant what they remember about the site structure and functions of the site. Clear recollection will confirm that the site is structured logically and help identify any labelling issues you may have missed.



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    07 Improve Usability Of Your Website

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    Improve Usability of Your Website No matter how brilliant your website design is, if it is hard to reach the content of your site then your site is as useful as an empty shell. Here are some tips to improve the usability of your website to ensure it serves its functions optimally. The first method is to make sure the typography of your content is suitable. If you have large blocks of text, make sure to use CSS to space out the lines accordingly. The longer a single line of text is, the greater the line height of each line should be. Also, make sure the font size of your text is big enough to read easily. Some sites have 10 pixel tall text in Verdana font; while that may look neat and tidy, you have to really strain your eyes to read the actual text. Make it easy for visitors to find content that they want on your site. If you have thousands of articles on your site and a certain visitor wants to find one single article from that pile, you have to provide a feasible means to enable visitors to do that without hassle. Be it an SQL driven database search engine or just a glossary or index of articles that you have, providing such a feature will make sure your visitors can use your site with ease. Ensure that your site loads fast if you do not want to lose visitors. Most internet users will leave a website if it doesn't load completely within 15 seconds, so make sure the crиme de la crиme of your website is delivered to the visitors as soon as possible to retain their attention. Last of all, test each and every link on your site before it goes online. There is nothing more effective in tarnishing your professional image than broken links, so be very careful about that.



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    Web Sites Are For Your Audience Not For You

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    It is easy to forget that building a web site is a process of bringing about solutions to your end user's problems (as in, how can I help my customers find my store? By adding a map to the web site). Many people create their web site with only their own goals in mind. This is a big mistake. People don't care about how neat your site is, or how much Flash you have developed, or the intricate JavaScript that you hand coded. They are interested in getting their problems solved, and solved quickly. So here are some tips on how you can make sure your site is based on your user's goals. First, find out what your users goals are. Find a sampling of people who are typical end users and email or call them. Politely ask them the kind of questions that will elicit useful feedback on their goals when they come to your site (for example, what are the three things you want above all when you visit our site?). If you already have a site, ask them what things do they find challenging about the site. This is an ideal chance to identify and fix things as well. As you actually create (or update) your web site, again keep the end user's goals in mind and make sure that they can get to the information quickly and easily. Nothing is more annoying than finding a site that has exactly what you are after and then be unable to purchase the item! The process of designing a site so it is easy to use is far harder than it looks at first. Usability, as it is called, is an entire realm of study when it comes to web sites. But in general, make sure users can navigate (that is, click around) to the most important features of your site easily. Do you offer a free tutorial on how to use your shareware software? Make sure you have a link to it on your navigation bar or at least prominently displayed on the home page. A pleasing design can go hand in hand with usability. However, it you are not a whiz at web design, then don't fret. A simple design that lets users navigate to their intended goal is far more preferable to a gorgeous site that people can't navigate. So make it look as attractive as possible but usability should always come first. And remember, the site is for your audience... not for you.



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    With Websites Nerve Wracking Html

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    With websites, nerve wracking HTML tweaking with the use of a web editing application is required before you can update them. As with blogs, platforms that concentrate more on content get rid of the rigors of working out HTML codes before you can publish. A website versus a blog in terms of web usability. Web usability refers to how to increase the conversion rate with the user friendliness of an application. Usability wise, a blog may not differ that much from a website. However, due to the ease of use of a blog and since it's also relatively easier to customize with all the ready templates, altering stuff to make it more helpful to visitors is also a lot less taxing compared to a website that requires design skills and copywriting skills. However, there are still some usability issues that bloggers need to address to be more effective in the field of blogging such as: hyper linking without the proper or identifying anchor links, not including an author's biography page or a well stated "About Us/Me" page, not so great posts and post titles, no author photo, great posts buried, etc. If one wishes to become a well known or as a credible figure in the field he or she is blogging about, those aspects of an excellent blog need to be given proper attention. Setting up AdSense on your Blog is a breeze, and you can complete the whole process in less then an hour. Free $97 Adsense Secret Ebook on Adsense Tips here. A website versus a blog in terms of author reader interaction. Blogs have this commentary feature where readers can leave a comment to any post they want to react to. The author of the blog can easily interact by also leaving a comment that's directed the commenter. With that feature, a blog offers more for the author reader dialog compared to a website. However, a website usually has a "Contact Us" page where an electronic mail can be sent to the webmaster or department concerned. How can you find high paying keywords for your Blog? Free $97 Secret Adsense Book at honestreview. info/adsense/index. html In conclusion, if you will be offering information that does not require regular updating, a website may just serve you well. But if you want more interaction going on and frequent updates without going over the fuss of HTML mess, a blog will work it out for you. But did you know that these two could also go hand in hand? Just do your homework and it will be an easy feat to work with either of these two applications.



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    Working On Website Content

    #1

    Performing market research is your first step in developing content. Create real value for your site visitors. The simplest and most effective market research is asking questions. Ask your customers what interests them. Pay attention to the questions they have for you. Keep a history of the most frequently e mailed questions or concerns. In the process learning about your customers, you can begin developing your content. Valuable content helps your site visitors to make better purchasing decisions or to learn about your product offerings. In addition, content drives more traffic to your site. Search engines love content. The more the merrier. Search engines consider frequently updated content valuable. When search engines believe your site contains valuable content they send you more traffic. If you have the same content as other sites your site may be penalized. Too much duplicate content and your site could be banned. Getting banned is considered a death sentence for a domain because it is excluded from search engine results thus losing out on visitors. Content without organization is chaos, so be sure your site is optimally categorized. Name each category with a concise and descriptive title. The categories should be consistent throughout the site for optimal navigation. Usability A website with poor usability results in decreased revenues. Your website is not about you, it is about your customers. Dedicate yourself to creating a website that is best suited for your audience. It is not enough that you fell in love with your web site the first time laid eyes on it. The only fact that matters is what your customers think. Do they like it; do they hate? The only way to find out is ask. Your customers can be your best usability testers. If they hate your site they will leave immediately, unless you have zero competition. Don’t even think about it, there is no business without competition. Your visitors may put up with smaller inconveniences such as a broken link. Don’t assume that your customers love your site because they don’t tell you anything. Be proactive and communicate, offer online surveys, e mail them with specific questions.



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    Improving Usability For Screen Reader Users

    #1

    Simply ensuring your website is accessible to screen reader users is unfortunately not enough to ensure these users can find what they're looking for in a reasonably quick and efficient manner. Even if your site is accessible to screen reader users, its usability could be so incredibly poor that they needn't have bothered coming to your site. Fortunately, there are plenty of simple to implement guidelines you can follow, which not only drastically improve usability for screen reader users, but for all web users: 1. Descriptive headings The use of on page headings is one of the most important usability features for screen reader users, as it helps them more easily understand the page structure. Although text on the page may appear to be a heading for sighted users, it must be labelled as a heading within the HTML code for screen reader users to know it is a heading. Screen readers don't look at web pages they read through the HTML code. If a piece of text is called a heading within the HTML code then the screen reader will announce that it's a heading. If not, screen reader users won't actually know if something that visually appears to be a heading is actually a heading. Another usability benefit of using headings for screen reader users, is that these users can call up a list of on page headings and jump to the section of the page in which they're most interested. This works in much the same way as sighted web users scanning through web pages by glancing at headings. If headings are descriptive of the content contained beneath them it becomes far easier for screen reader users to find the information which they're after. 2. Descriptive link text Screen reader users can browse through web pages by calling up a list of on page links, and activating the link in which they're most interested. As such, non descriptive link text such as ‘click here' should be avoided at all costs as it makes no sense whatsoever out of context. The good news is that the use of descriptive link texts represents a usability benefit for everyone. When we scan through web pages, one of the items that stands out to us is link text. ‘Click here' is totally meaningless to web users scanning through pages and forces users to hunt through surrounding text to discover the link destination. 3. Lists Using lists within the HTML code is extremely useful for screen reader users, as screen readers announce the number of items in each list before reading out the list items. This helps these users know what to expect when hearing a list of items (such as site navigation). This works in mush the same way as an answer phone telling you how many messages you have, before listening to them. By informing you of how many messages you have, you instantly know what to expect. If there's only one or two messages you can probably remember them; much more and you'll probably want to get a pen and paper and make notes. The use of lists is really just a behind the scenes change to the code and needn't affect the visual appearance of the website. 4. Logical linearization Screen reader users generally have to listen to web pages from start to finish, top to bottom, left to right. Sighted web users on the other hand can glance through a web page almost randomly, spotting important information wherever it may appear on the page. Because of this, important information should always be placed towards the top of the page. One example of how not to do this is to place instructions for a form at the bottom of the page. Placing important information towards the top of the page actually benefits everyone, as the important information is now in the place where sighted users look first the top of the page. 5. Short, succinct ALT text ALT text is the alternative text for images that gets read out to screen reader users. Any website offering even basic accessibility will provide this alternative text. Some websites try to over explain the information conveyed by images, forcing screen reader users to have to listen to a lot of unnecessary and irrelevant information. Screen reader users often take longer than sighted web users to work through websites, so help make their surfing time easier with succinct ALT text. 6. Short, front loaded paragraphs Front loading means placing the conclusion first, followed by the what, why, when, where and how. By placing the conclusion first, screen reader users can instantly gain an understanding of what the paragraph's about. They can then decide whether they want to keep on listening or if they want to skip to the next paragraph (which they can easily do with the screen reader). If the paragraphs are short, they can do this safe in the knowledge that they won't be missing extra information. Front loading content obviously benefits everyone, as web users no longer have to search around for the main point of each paragraph. 7. Descriptive page title The page title is the very first thing that screen reader users hear when arriving at any web page, so it's truly essential that it's descriptive of the page. Again, this benefits everyone as users can use the page title to orientate themselves and confirm that they're on the page they think they're on. This is especially true for web users on dial up connections where the page title displays a number of seconds before the rest of the page. Conclusion There are a number of relatively simple and painless things that can be done to improve usability for screen reader users. Fortunately, nearly all of them improve usability for all web users, meaning everyone benefits which is never a bad thing.



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    Web Accessibility For Screen Magnifier Users

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    The needs of screen magnifier users are overlooked when implementing web accessibility on to a website. Screen magnifiers are used by partially sighted web users to increase the size of on screen elements. Some users will magnify the screen so that only three to four words are able to appear on the screen at any one time. You can try using a screen magnifier yourself by downloading the Zoomtext screen magnifier from aisquared. com/Products/ZoomText8_mag/FreeTrial/Z8FreeTrial. htm for a free 30 day trial. The good news is that some of the basic principles for improving accessibility and usability for screen magnifiers users, also increase usability for everyone. To help, we've listed six ways to improve accessibility and usability for screen magnifier users: 1. Don't embed text within images Text embedded within images can become blurry and pixelated when viewed in screen magnifiers, and therefore completely illegible. This is especially true when the image text is rather poor quality, so if you absolutely have to embed text within images then make sure the image is of high quality. Many screen magnifier users can find it quite difficult to read text at the best of times, so when it appears fuzzy to them it can become difficult to impossible to read. It's not usually necessary to embed text within images anymore, as most presentational effects can now be achieved with CSS. By embedding text within images the download time of each page can become significantly greater due to the weight of these images for users on dial up modems it can be a real pain waiting for these images to download and render. If you're not sure if a piece of text on the page is embedded within an image or not, try highlighting the text. If you can highlight each letter individually then the text is real text and isn't embedded within an image. 2. Clearly separate sections of the page Different sections of each web page should be clearly separated through the use of borders and different background colours. Screen magnifiers users can only see one tiny section of a web page at any one time so it can sometimes be hard for these users to orientate themselves within the page. By using a blue background colour for the navigation, for example, screen magnifier users can quickly move through the page and when they see a blue background they instantly know that the content are has finished and the navigation area begun. Likewise, by separating different sections of the page with borders, when a screen magnifier user moves over that border they know they're moving into a different section. One especially common form of this, is using a vertical bar to separate horizontal navigation items. Separating different sections of the page with background colours and borders doesn't only increase usability for screen magnifier users it increases usability for everyone. When regularly sighted users scan through a web page, if the content, footer and navigation are all effectively differentiated it's very easy to quickly gain an understanding of the on page layout. 3. Use clear and descriptive headings often When screen magnifier users move their magnifier across the screen one of the items that stand out to them is headings. By ensuring heading text is large, and perhaps by differentiating it through the use of colour, it will stand out to these users. Screen magnifier users usually have to stop the movement of the magnifier when they want to read a piece of text, so when they see a heading, they can stop and read it. Because headings (in theory at least!) describe the content contained beneath them, screen magnifier users can read a heading, gain an understanding of the content beneath it, and decide whether they want to read that content or not. If not, they can simply move the magnifier down the screen and stop at the next heading. Headings are incredibly useful for fully sighted users too for essentially the same reason. When you scan through a web page, headings are one of the items that stand out to you. Again, you can read the heading (or listen to it for a screen reader user), and provided its descriptive, instantly gain an understanding of the content beneath it. You can then keep reading or skip on to the next heading down the page. 4. Ensure link text is descriptive of its destination Link text such as ‘click here' and ‘more' should be avoided and replaced with link text that adequately describes the link destination. Link text, along with headings, is one of the items that stands out to screen magnifier users (and all users for that matter) when browsing a web page. If ‘click here' is used then these users (and in fact all users) will have to search through the text before and after the link in order to work out its destination. 5. Avoid scrolling or flashing text Scrolling or flashing text is generally known for offering poor usability, as it means that users can't read the text in their own time. This is doubly true for screen magnifier users who read web pages at a slower rate chances are that they won't have time to read the text at all before it disappears. 6. Front load paragraph content By front loading paragraph content, screen magnifier users can access the main point of each paragraph immediately. Front loading means placing the conclusion first, followed by the what, why, when, where and how. By placing the conclusion first, screen magnifier users can read the conclusion of the paragraph straightaway and then decide whether they are interested in reading the rest of the paragraph or not. If screen magnifier users aren't interested in the content of a paragraph, they can move the magnifier down the screen and when they see white space they know that the paragraph has ended and the next paragraph begun. This rule about front loading paragraph content actually benefits absolutely everyone. By putting the conclusion at the start of the paragraph, all users can instantly gain an understanding of the point of the paragraph and decide whether they want to keep reading it (or skip to the next paragraph). Conclusion All in all, there are quite a few things that can be done to improve usability and accessibility for screen magnifier users. The good news though is that all of them improve usability for absolutely everyone.



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    The Secret Benefit Of Accessibility Part 1 Increased Usability

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    : Web accessibility has so many benefits that I really do wonder why such a large number of websites have such diabolically bad accessibility. One of the main benefits is increased usability, which according to usability guru, Jakob Nielson, can increase the sales/conversion rate of a website by 100% and traffic by 150%. At which point you must surely be asking, "So if I make my website accessible its usability will increase and I'll make more money out of it?". Well, not quite. An accessible website is not automatically more usable but there are many areas of overlap: 1. Descriptive link text Visually impaired web users can scan web pages by tabbing from link to link and listening to the content of the link text. As such, the link text in an accessible website must always be descriptive of its destination. Equally, regularly sighted web users don't read web pages word for word, but scan them looking for the information they're after. Link text such as 'Click here' has poor accessibility and usability as both regularly sighted and visually impaired web users scanning the paragraph will take no meaning from this link text by itself. Link text that effectively describes its destination is far easier to scan and you can understand the destination of the link without having to read its surrounding words. 2. Prompt text assigned to form input In order to make forms accessible we need to assign the prompt text to its form item. THis is especially useful when done with checkboxes and radioboxes, as the text becomes clickable too. Checkboxes and radioboxes are small and pernickety for even the steadiest of hands so by increasing the clickable region everyone benefits. 3. Large chunks of information divided up There are a number of techniques that can be taken to increase the usability for visually impaired users, who have to listen to the information on each page and try to remember it. By structuring information into small, manageable groups, enhanced usability for these users can be achieved. Methods to accomplish this can include using sub headings to break up body content, grouping form items with the fieldset command and using lists. Breaking down groups of information is obviously highly useful for sighted web users too, as it greatly enhances our ability to scan the screen quickly. 4. Site map provided Site maps can be a useful accessibility tool for visually impaired users as they provide a straightforward list of links to the main pages on the site, without any of the fluff in between. Site maps are of course useful for everyone as they provide us with a way of finding pages quickly and help us visualise the structure of the website. 5. Simple and easy language >From an accessibility point of view, this one's important for people with reading and/or cognitive disabilities and site visitors who's first language isn't the one you're writing in. From a usability point of view, well, it helps everyone. Reading from computer screens is tiring for the eyes and about 25% slower than reading from paper. As such, the easier the style of writing the easier it is for site visitors to absorb your words of wisdom. Wherever possible shorten your sentences. Use, ‘apply' instead of ‘make an application' or ‘use' instead of ‘make use of'. 6. Consistent navigation Having consistent navigation across pages is also important for maximising accessibility to people with reading and/or cognitive disabilities, but again everyone benefits. Each time you visit a new website it takes you a few seconds to adjust to the unique layout and user interface of that page. Well imagine if you had to do that every time you follow a link to a new page! By having a consistent interface across a website we can instantly locate the navigation and page content without having to look around for it. In reality, most sites do have consistent navigation across most pages. The main culprit for falling foul of this guideline is the homepage, which some websites structure quite differently to the rest of the site. By having a consistent interface across the entire website we can instantly locate the page content without having to look around for it. 7. No unannounced pop ups For web users utilising screen readers pop ups can be a real accessibility nuisance. Screen readers read out the content of whichever window is on top of the others. Pop ups display over the top of the main website so will always be read out first. For visually impaired users this can be frustrating as they may not realise that what they're hearing isn't the ‘real' website. So, pop ups are bad for accessibility. As for usability, well I'm sure you hate pop ups as much as I do. Many toolbars, such as the Google toolbar, now come packaged with a pop up blocker so allow you to surf the web without the irritation of new windows popping up. 8. CSS used for layout CSS based sites are generally have a greater ratio of content to HTML code so are more accessible to screen readers and search engines. Websites using CSS for layout can also be made accessible to in car browsers, WebTV and PDAs. Don't underestimate the importance of this in 2008 alone there'll be an estimated 58 million PDAs sold worldwide (source: etforecasts. com/pr/pr0603.htm). As well as improved accessibility, CSS based websites have one large usability benefit: increased download speed. Broadband isn't as widespread as you may think. In the UK for example, just one in four web users are hooked up to broadband (source: statistics. gov. uk/pdfdir/intc0504.pdf) so improving the download speed of your web pages could provide a great usability advantage over your competitors. 9. Transcripts available for audio One group of web users with special accessibility needs that doesn't get much press is hearing impaired users, who need written equivalents for audio content. Providing transcripts is in fact highly beneficial to all users. Many of your site visitors probably can't be bothered to wait for your 3Mb audio file to download and start playing. They may prefer just a quick outline of what's contained in the audio content. By providing a transcript, broken up by sub headings and with the key terms highlighted, non disabled site visitors can skim through it and get a general idea of the content. They can then make a more informed decision about if they want to wait for the 3Mb audio file to download. 10. Screen flickering and movement avoided Some epileptic web users must be careful to avoid screen flicker of between 2 and 55 Hz. Web users with reading and/or cognitive disabilities and those using screen magnifiers will struggle to keep up with scrolling text (if you do have scrolling text be sure to provide a mechanism to stop it). In addition to being a bad idea for accessibility, neither flickering nor scrolling text are good for usability either. The former can be distracting when you're trying to read something and you see flashing out the corner of your eye; the latter isn't good either as you have to wait for the content to slowly appear. When you see scrolling text do you usually bother to stop what you're doing so you can read it as it gradually materialises? Or do you ignore it? The other disadvantage of scrolling or changing text is that you might see something you want to click on, but before you know it it's gone. And now you have to wait 30 seconds for it to re appear again! Conclusion With all this overlap between web usability and web accessibility there's no excuses for not implementing basic accessibility on to your website. Outside of the ethical argument there are many reasons to make your website accessible, one of the main one being that its usability will be improved. No one can argue with that.



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    Usability Testing With Children

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    Usability testing with children is similar in many respects to usability testing with adults. In order to get the most out of the sessions, and ensure the child is comfortable and happy, there are a few differences that you need to be aware of. Stress of new people and surroundings Children are far more likely than adults to find encountering new places and people stressful. You should always remember this, so try to find as many ways as possible to relax the child. Some things you could do are: Allow a significant period of time at least 10 minutes to meet the child. This is critical in putting them at ease before beginning the session. Some easy things to talk about might be computer games, cartoons, sports or school. Trying to make all the equipment used during the session match that which the child uses at home/school (phone up their parents/teachers beforehand to check). Try to be as comforting and reassuring as possible. It's especially important to make it clear to the child that you want their views on the site and that you're not testing them. Plan for the fact that younger children may prefer their parents to remain in the testing room with them. Make sure that parents know that they should stay out of the child's line of sight and not help or distract them. Asking for help Children are far more used to asking for and receiving help than adults, so it's very important for the moderator to: Clearly explain at the beginning of the test that you want the child to use the site on their own Make a sustained effort to deflect any such questioning during the session itself Good ways of deflecting questions can include: Answering a question with a question (e. g. What do you think [you should do now]?) Re stating that you want the child to use the site ‘on their own' Asking the child to have ‘one last go' before you move on to something else Children get tired, bored and discouraged more easily Children (especially of younger ages) are less inclined and/or able to apply themselves to a single task for a prolonged period. Some ways to work around this are: Limiting sessions to 1 hour or less. Taking short breaks during sessions if the child becomes tired or irritable. Ensuring that sessions cover the intended tasks/scenarios in a different order this will make sure that the same scenarios are not always tested by tired children, who are less likely to succeed/persevere. Asking the child for help so as to provide them with motivation (e. g. asking ‘Could you please find out for me how to...', or by actually pretending to not be able find/do something on the site). Keeping up a steady stream of encouragement and positive feedback ("You're doing really well and telling us lots of useful things it will really help make the site better. Keep it up!"). The importance of non verbal cues Children can't always be relied upon to verbally articulate their thoughts/feelings, either due to their: Not being articulate enough Being too shy Not wanting to say the wrong thing and displease an adult Saying things they don't believe just to please the adult This makes it particularly important that the usability expert be sensitive to children's non verbal cues, such as: Sighs Smiles Frowns Yawns Fidgeting Laughing Swaying Body angle and posture Physical differences A couple of very obvious but easily forgotten differences which need to be taken into account are: Chair and table settings Make sure you have a chair/table setting that allows the child to comfortably use the equipment during the session. Microphone positioning Children tend to have quieter voices than adults, so microphones should be placed slightly nearer to the participant than normal. Levels of literacy and understanding It is critical to ensure that a session's participant has an accurate understanding of the scenario being presented to them. Some ways to do this include: Asking participants to re phrase scenarios/goals in their own words. Asking participants to repeat a scenario (i. e. what they are trying to achieve) if the task has gone on for some time and you suspect they may have forgotten it.



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    Problems With Web Analytics

    #1

    There are two major problems with web presence analytics; they’re either non existent or too complicated. Many people may be against using web analytics because it not only measures success it also measures failure. Someone in charge of marketing might be afraid to use web analytics because it would prove the failure scientifically. Avoiding web analytics because it shows failure is the wrong attitude. We learn from our failures and we must welcome the opportunity to gain knowledge of them. There is a lack of skilled employees required to manage, distribute and analyze Web analytics. Historically, web analytics was developed by IT for IT. The people using them were comfortable with dealing with raw data. Web analytics tools have been designed to be interpreted by technical personnel. There was little regard for people without technical skills. As a result, the rest of the organization has become alienated from analytics. A good web analytics solution has to be easy to understand for any member of the organization. One of the biggest misconceptions of web analytics is that it needs to be complex. Often, web analytics generate a huge amount of data. The end result is data overload that lacks actionable information. Frequently, insignificant data becomes the noise around actionable data. The noise makes the process overwhelming. Instead of providing answers, web analytics can create more questions. Meaningful interpretation of data has created a hostile attitude toward web analytics among the non technical people of the organization. Web analytics is not easy by any stretch of the imagination. Web analytics tools provide data not information or insight. We need the tools to provide us with the raw data, but it’s up to us to make sense of it all. The real value of KPI is continuous monitoring. It is not a once a year or once a quarter project. At the very least, you should examine your KPIs once a month. Monitoring is continuous; reviewing happens on a regular interval. The most important KPIs are the ones that measure whether business objectives are met or not. It is great to know how many visitors a web site has in a month, but it is more useful to know what percentage of users make a purchase. Web sites are no longer just online catalogs with a shopping cart. They are becoming complex applications with high levels of interactivity. Today, a highly usable site is also highly interactive. If the on site search is not working properly, you have a web site that lack interactivity. Therefore, it scores low in the usability scale. If the site navigation is counter intuitive, it will result in low usability score. All of the above will result in lower conversion therefore lower revenue. According to studies, many online shoppers give up and abandon the shopping process due to usability issues. Web analytics must be viewed as an activity directly tied to revenue. It is indeed a revenue generating process. The absence of web analytics can result in loss of revenue, and the presence of it will almost certainly result in increased revenue.



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    A Shrubbery For Web Back Up

    #1

    Most of the people follow your website on two ways from own promotions, from search engines A number of research show that all web users depend on search for guidance on the net. So, one of the most probable route user will take for your website is through search engines. Especially, e fuzion sites often get a sale from users browsing through their catalog. e fuzion differs from other websites in having confirmation and fulfillment stages that follow up on user’s initial visit. Closing the first sale is one of the most important drivers of subsequent ecommerce sales. So in this case Web Design Delhi consultancy optimizes for search engine which will lead to increase in online business. While usability features are primarily intended for the end users, a designer should also think of the search engine robots that will regularly come to visit the site, to index and refresh its pages. In order priority, the five most important usability features a designer should always implement in web site. That’s ease of routing, simplicity and intuitiveness, clearly indicated menus and links, a well designed site map, clean uncluttered design. A well designed navigation had two benefits. Which helps the users to find better index the inside site. Web Design Delhi consultancy always conscious for design a good sight map. It makes sure the site map is directly linked to the homepage. Web Design Delhi consultancy makes sure that the site map link is a text link. Make sure that site map page does not exceed indexation limit. Web Design Delhi consultancy (e fuzion) provides big strategies to design web sites neat and cleanly.



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