Navigation
  • Best Free Essay
  • Essay archive
  • Essay database online
  • Find Essay
  • Free college essay
  • Free College Essay
  • Free Custom Essay
  • Free Essay Alabama
  • Free Essay Alaska
  • Free Essay Arizona
  • Free Essay Arkansas
  • Free Essay Australia
  • Free Essay California
  • Free Essay Canada
  • Free Essay Colorado
  • Free Essay contests
  • Free Essay course
  • Free Essay editor
  • Free Essay Florida
  • Free Essay generator
  • Free Essay Georgia
  • Free Essay grader
  • Free Essay Hawaii
  • Free Essay help
  • Free Essay Idaho
  • Free Essay Illinois
  • Free Essay India
  • Free Essay Indiana
  • Free Essay introduction
  • Free Essay Iowa
  • Free Essay Ireland
  • Free Essay Israel
  • Free Essay Kansas
  • Free Essay Kentucky
  • Free Essay Louisiana
  • Free Essay Malaysia
  • Free Essay Massachusetts
  • Free Essay Mississippi
  • Free Essay Missouri
  • Free Essay Montana
  • Free Essay Nebraska
  • Free Essay New Hampshire
  • Free Essay New Zealand
  • Free Essay North Carolina
  • Free Essay North Dakota
  • Free Essay Oklahoma
  • Free Essay outline
  • Free Essay papers
  • Free Essay proofreading
  • Free Essay review
  • Free Essay Saba
  • Free Essay samples
  • Free Essay Sarawak
  • Free Essay scholarships
  • Free Essay Scotland
  • Free Essay Service
  • Free Essay Singapore
  • Free Essay Sint Eustatius
  • Free Essay South Africa
  • Free Essay South Carolina
  • Free Essay South Dakota
  • Free Essay Swaziland
  • Free Essay teachers
  • Free Essay Tennessee
  • Free Essay Texas
  • Free Essay topics
  • Free Essay United Kingdom
  • Free Essay United States of America
  • Free Essay Utah
  • Free Essay Virginia
  • Free Essay Wales
  • Free Essay West Virginia
  • Free Essay writer
  • Free Essay writing
  • Free Essay writing online
  • Free Essay writing service
  • Free Essay Wyoming
  • Free Essays Alabama
  •  
    Free Essay
    7.5 of 10 on the basis of 973 Review.
     

     

     

     

     

     

         
     

    The Complete Tourist Guide To Cornwall

    #1

    Cornwall is probably the most popular UK tourist destination as each year thousands of people head to the southwest. They travel in seek of the stunning beaches and coastline, the small fishing villages, the historic mines and last but not least, the world class surf. How to Get There Generally, visitors travel to Cornwall by car, bus or rail. However, there is a small airport in Newquay that offers connecting flights to Manchester and London’s Gatwick and Stansted Airports. Accommodation Cornwall offers a wide range of accommodation types that include hotels, guest houses, self catering options, camping and caravan parks, and the ever popular bed and breakfasts. There are also many holiday homes and cottages scattered about the little coastal villages. History Cornwall has an extensive history that dates back to the Stone Age. The area is riddled with ancient archaeological sites and stone circles, not to mention the hundreds of mines and tunnels. Although it is a fishing community and has many little harbors, it is the mining industry that Cornwall received the majority of its income from. Heavy metals were the main production with copper and tin being the main exports. Cornwall is now famed for its surf and associated lifestyle. This is a major contributor to its primary income source from tourism. Shopping Cornwall does not compare to large cities in the shopping category as it is a rural community. However, Newquay, Penzance, Truro and Falmouth are small towns with lots of unique craft and clothes shops. All the small villages have convenience stores with the odd surf shop as well. Eating and drinking As Cornwall is a rural area, the traditional English pub is the most common sight for dining. However, you can find all types of international food around the towns of Truro and Newquay. Cornish pasties are renowned and are a must if you are after a quick snack. Sightseeing: Cornwall has wonderful coastal paths that attract hundreds of walkers each year. Lands end is in impressive feature as it is the most southerly mainland point in Britain and looks out across the Atlantic Ocean. The Eden Project by St Austell is another must see.



    +

    Livin Large In Small Boutique Hotels In Cornwall

    #1

    They pretend to hate the flashbulbs. They sulk, and pout when confronted with an army of cameras. But make no mistake about it: the Paris Hiltons, Britney Spearses, and Jessica Simpsons love paparazzi attention. It is the best brand exposure they can possibly get. It's free, relentless, and its right there on their doorstep literally! That's why you will never catch these new kids on the fame block hiding out in small boutique hotels in Cornwall. No way! For these folks only the biggest, brightest, most visible hotels and locations in the world are acceptable. They're easy to find, and there's plenty of time to primp and preen in the elevator on the way down to the lobby. And if you're talent free and live to have your picture taken, this is raison d'etre. Mega Bucks, Mega Secrets What about the truly rich and the truly famous, though? Well, they know what the rest of us should know but never concede, which is that nothing attracts a crowd like a crowd. When the mega dons of old money see a crowd, they quietly lower the screen separating the back of the limo from the driver and casually instruct them, "One of the small boutique hotels in Cornwall please, Raoul." Unlike the Hiltons, Spearses, and Simpsons, they go where no one else wants to go and stay where no one else wants to stay. Old Money Meets Old World For the truly wealthy, there are few better options than the small boutique hotels in Cornwall. Why? Well, it's quite simple. Think of the top five no, top ten most likely places in the world to find a celebrity for publicity pickings. Does Cornwall feature in your list? No way. How about a top fifty? Or a top hundred? You'd have to go a long way down the list to get any idea about the privacy value afforded by the small boutique hotels in Cornwall. There's no way on Earth small boutique hotels in Cornwall will ever pop up all over the countryside like lambs in springtime, or be packed to the gunwales with movie stars, film directors, "gangsta" rappers, media tycoons, supermodels, and Victoria Beckham look alikes. But on the other hand, if they did genuinely want to get away from it all, one of the small boutique hotels in Cornwall would be a safer bet than most. Discretion is the keyword for burying oneself and one's private affairs amongst the quaint rusticity of one of the small boutique hotels in Cornwall. After all, the misty heart of pastoral England is well below the glaring radar of paparazzi flashbulbs. Comfort on a Publicity Free Silver Platter So what's the attraction? There are about as many different definitions of small boutique hotels in Cornwall as there are people who offer them. Generally, however, small boutique hotels in Cornwall are a small hotel with anywhere up to around 400 rooms. They are not a part of any chain, such as the Westin, Marriot, or the Hilton. The small boutique hotels in Cornwall come with the promise of a rustic almost family cottage type atmosphere, the feel of five hundred year old oak panels, six hundred year old Mahogany dining tables, roaring open fires in a stone fireplace that's six feet tall, retiring to the library, and savoring the taste of old port, ancient brandy, and fat cigars after dinner while reclining in the deeply buttoned leather armchairs once occupied by none other than the first duke of Tewkesbury in AD 1465. Oh yes, as far as shopping like royalty and keeping it hushed hushed goes, you can't go to a better place than small boutique hotels in Cornwall.



    +

    Explore The Camel Trail In Cornwall

    #1

    Are you mad about cycling? Recent studies show that you are not alone. In fact, cycling is becoming increasingly popular in the UK, with Cornwall being named as one of the most idyllic places to experience a cycling holiday. So, why are so many people taking to two wheels? The most obvious answer that springs to mind is that people are cycling to keep fit and help the environment. A closer look, however, reveals something else: an increase in cycleways and routes. Over the last decade people and charities alike have been working hard to ensure that Britain become a cycle friendly nation. Not only providing cycle lanes that run alongside roads but also traffic free cycleways. One of the most well loved cycleways which has come to life in the last few years is the Camel Trail in Cornwall. The British countryside certainly doesn’t get much more breathtaking than the wonderful Cornish landscape and the Camel Trail presents the perfect place to begin an exploration of the fruits Cornwall has to offer. The Camel Trail is a well loved cycleway, which spans a wonderful piece of Cornish countryside over a distance of 17 miles from Padstow to Poleys Bridge. With approximately 350,000 users per year the Camel Trail is loved by locals and holidaymakers alike as an idyllic way to appreciate Cornish beauty at its best. Established as a cycleway in 2001, this cycleway follows the path of a disused railway line which was built in 1834 and linked London to the south west part of the country. Cyclists who are intending to use The Camel Trail will find that they are able to hire their bikes from a variety of cycle shops along the cycleway and throughout the general area; including Padstow, Wadebridge and Bodmin. From this wonderful cycleway you will be able to discover a whole host of wildlife and enjoy the wonderful scenes as they unroll before your eyes. Furthermore, if you choose The Camel Trail for your cycling holiday in Cornwall you will have the time to explore all the little villages and towns along the way.



    +

    The History Culture Food Of Cornwall And Devon

    #1

    Brief History Of Cornwall & Devon The first remains of a basic society in Cornwall dates back to 4500 BC – primative stone tools have been found from this era indicating the existence of a settlement (in a town called Redruth). Cornwall saw an “invasion” from the Celts during 1000 BC – the Celts were warriors from Europe and were largely the ancestors of current day Cornish folk. Devon is believed by many historians to be one of the very first places in England to have settlers. Indeed, Dartmoor (a National Park in the centre of Devon) still offers a lot of prehistoric sites of interest. Further it’s from Plymouth that the Pilgrim Fathers first set sail to the Americas – and also where Sir Francis Drake went off to battle the Spanish Armada. Dartmoor also is home to some of the oldest structures in England – primitive buildings & remains include stone circles, burial mounds and ancient settlements. While the Roman invasion of Britain left Cornwall largely untouched the same cannot be said of Devon. The Romans took over much of current day Devon including a port at Topsham and a legion at Exeter. The Romans were no longer controlling Devon by around 400 and by 800 it had fallen under the rule of Wessex (King Egbert). During the 14th & 15th century, Devon was under serious threat from the French who raided the Devon coastline. Food & Drink In Cornwall – Great Pubs, Good Food And Drink! It’s true that the Cornish enjoy their food – so much so that Cornwall & Devon are known almost as much for their culinary offerings as their stunning scenery and coasts. The famous Cornish Pasty is just one of the local edible treats available in this charming English county. The Cornish pasty is a tasty puff pastry that’s stuffed with beef steak (or mince), onions, potatoes and seasoned with pepper. It must be tried (assuming you’re not a vegetarian) at least once during your visit to Cornwall. Famous starters include Kiddly Broth, a soup made with onions, bacon and hard bread as well as nettle soup (yes, it’s made from real nettles). Fish & Chips is a famous English dish – however, the Cornish use beer to make theirs and it certainly makes for an interesting variation of standard fish and chips. Star Gazy Pie is a pastry made with pilchards (herring or mackerel can also be used), boiled eggs, bacon, onions and white wine. Fancy something sweet? Cornish sweets include Cornish Cherry Choclets (a mix of chocolate, syrup, cherries and butter), Cornish Splits (made from sugar, milk, flour and lard) and Figgy ‘obbin (a baked treat consisting of raisins, milk, sugar and flour). As you’d probably expect by now the Cornish also have their own signature drinks. These include Aunt Ellys Nog (a mix of eggs, cream, vanilla, sugar and milk), Cornish Mine Punch (rum, brandy, lemons and sugar) and Cornish Spiced Mead. Other foods that Cornwall is known for are the rich Cornish fudge and ice cream and Cornish Hevva Cake. Weather In Devon & Cornwall – When To Go While Cornwall and Devon enjoys some of the mildest weather anywhere in the UK, summer time still remains the peak time to visit. Cornwall experiences the mildest winters in Great Britain – rarely does it snow in winter and summer days tend to be wonderfully warm and sunny. In Cornwall, May is a very good time to visit, and all months up to July enjoy around seven hours of sunshine a day. The Obby Oss Summer Ceremony In Cornwall If you happen to visit Cornwall during May Day then a visit to Padstow is highly recommended to witness the all but mad event of Obby Oss. This strange ceremony is performed every year in order to “welcome summer” (something that perhaps the rest of Britain should consider). During this colourful and noisy procession, two large masks representing horses are paraded through the town accompanied by musicians playing the “Obby Oss May Song”.



    +

    Favourite British Scenic Drives St Just To St Ives

    #1

    The barbed Atlantic winds screamed at me relentlessly, penetrating the bones and drowning the songs of seabirds. Cape Cornwall stood defiantly in the face of the mighty Atlantic Ocean, sculptured over time by driving currents, wind and rain. Cape Cornwall lies in the far west of county Cornwall, deep in the south westerly reaches of England. Standing sentry against the intensity of the Atlantic, Cape Cornwall guards the town of St Just from the worst of the elements. St Just is the last major town in England before the shipping graveyard of Land’s End and its treacherous stretch of rugged coastline. A delightful little town, St Just is just minutes from the ancient monument site of Carn Gluze on the Penwith Heritage Coast. Travelling north from St Just along the B3306, you soon descend a steep gradient before passing through the sleepy little village of Botallack. A little further is the enchanting Pendeen, home to the old Geevor Tin Mines, offering a glimpse of days gone by and unenviable working practises. Pendeen Watch stands at the head of the shore, embedding you amongst the jagged Cornish coastline at the mercy of the elements and Atlantic Ocean. The South West Coast Path provides opportunity to explore more of the seacoast. The coastal road continued northeast through Morvah village and the excellent coastal observation post Gurnards Head, before the panorama broadened to incorporate a vast expanse of land slowly descend as it approached the sea. Vibrant coloured plants and shrubs blanketed the ground as they raced across the decline towards the towering cliff tops, stopping suddenly at the edge to observe the high seas. A fusion of scents emanated from the vast array of flowers swaying in the ocean breeze. The narrow road continued to twist and turn slowly through the pretty Cornish countryside. The monopoly of fields and shrubs rescinded upon arrival of Zennor. Calm and peaceful, this serene village seemed the perfect antidote to the rigours of modern day city living. A steep downhill gradient preceded the final approach to St Ives with its tight cobbled streets and busy harbour. The land began to rise again as the town neared. Tantalising glimpses of St Ives Bay and a glut of sailing vessels suddenly emerged between breaks in the houses. The steep descent through cramped streets became a battle of wills with pedestrians; everybody fought for the same space. A fortunate place in the harbour car park left me gazing into the Atlantic. The wind had now relented; all was calm again.



    +

    In Pursuit Of Miller S Landscape

    #1

    I have always been a great admirer of the artist John Miller. His simplistic coastal landscapes are a wonderful escape from the rigours of city life in Birmingham. But what of the subjects of his work? Were they just figments of his imagination or did these places actually exist? Since buying my first print 'Estuary', his worlds have always seemed a beautiful Utopia, scenes of unrivalled natural beauty, somewhere I wanted to be. Eventually I discovered his work portrayed much of the coastline of St Ives Bay in Cornwall, the county of unrivalled myths and legends, and that the estuary in question was in Hayle. It wasn't long until I was making my way south along the M5 motorway in pursuit of the landscape John Miller had found so irresistible. The M5 takes you to the south of England. Picking up the A30 would take me into the far reaches of the southwest, first Devon and ultimately into Cornwall. The journey down the M5 was fairly nondescript. There's little to catch your eye as you make your way south. The motorway is simply a link to all the towns and cities along the west coast. But upon reaching Devon, the A30 takes you through beautiful English countryside. Green rolling hills frame the horizon. The land is dressed like a patchwork quilt as farmers go about their daily business harvesting the land and seeing to the many animals scattered about their fields. Driving through Cornwall was equally enjoyable, though the skyline was dominated occasionally by manmade structures. The green land and blue waters of isolated lakes were interrupted by huge wind turbines. Stood like giant white sentinels, though they may be a little sore on the eye, they are an essential piece of the jigsaw if governments are to find alterative energy sources to ease the threat of global warming. The 'Welcome to Hayle' sign was greeted with a sigh of relief having spent the past five hours on the road. I headed for the docks and parked the car. There were a dozen or so fishing boats in the harbour, many manned as fisherman prepared their vessels for a days work. I left the boats and followed the water as it led through the estuary. It snaked its way through the contours of the land. As I rounded a final bend the river met the sea and for the first time I could see where Miller had painted 'Estuary'. I stood at the precise spot he must have sat with his easel. It was easy to imagine the inspiration that must have flooded through his body. As I walked nearer to the sea, the scene unfolded before me. To the left the coast continued to sweep around before reaching the town of St Ives. I headed right, trying to stay out the way of the dozens of wind surfers scattered about the beach. Now the whole of the bay was visible. Several miles of golden sands lay before me. As the shoreline drifted away to the left, Godrevy Lighthouse stood at the end of the bay, so prominent in many of John Miller's paintings. Finally I had seen Miller's landscape come to life.



    +

    Travel To England A Setting Sun A Dawning Era

    #1

    : The sun may have set on the English Empire of history books, but by no means is England's worldly cultural influence waning. The cosmopolitan hot spots of sophisticated London and avant garde Manchester speak to the global future while the Roman remnants in Bath and Celtic heritage at Stonehenge stand as monumental tributes to a time past but not forgotten. Experience England Culinary Intrigue The Brits may not traditionally be known, or even praised, for their gastronomic heritage; however, England has recently experienced a culinary renaissance of sorts and can proudly boast 14 of the world's top 50 restaurants. Erase thoughts of porridge and stodge – the British dining experience has abandoned its starchy past and embarked on a journey through multicultural and international cuisine, particularly in the South. England's colonial history comes forth in London's exquisite choice of Indian restaurants. Despite this new food wave, make sure not to pass on the Yorkshire pudding and Beef Wellington when traveling through the North, which offers exceptional renditions of more traditional dishes. From London to Land's End Upon arrival in the English region of this massive island, it is important to include travel outside of London for the full British experience. England's most southwestern tip of Cornwall is home to the legendary sea cliffs below Penzance and the dramatic peninsula of Land's End where a 25 mile trail will take you along some of the most beautiful stretches of ocean. Cornwall is also known for its architectural landmarks, including Cotehele, a most impressive Tudor mansion and museum along the river Tamar. Travel northeast to encounter ancient towns nestled in the picturesque countryside of The Cotswolds. This region is extremely popular for a glimpse into the idyllic English lifestyle with its 14th century stone and thatched roof cottages and cobblestone alleys. Keep in mind that the southern regions are heavily traveled in the months of July and August by locals and foreigners alike due to the warmer weather. Farther north, the ancient spa town of Bath is famous for the 2000 year old Roman bathhouses, which are still open to the public, in addition to Saxon ruins and the history of local Christianity told by the Heritage Vaults. Shakespeare buffs should not miss Stratford upon Avon, his home town located in the Midlands. Shakespeare and his family are buried at the Holy Trinity Church in the heart of town. While visiting the most northern regions, travel through York to see Europe's largest Gothic cathedral, York Minster, and walk along the immaculately preserved medieval street of The Shambles. Even more enchanting are the still standing city walls that enclose a magical mix of history and modernity in a city that was once the Danish capital of Viking England. A Region of Global Heritage Aside from England's ancient history, no other nation has had such a hand in human progress in the modern era. At one time the English Empire encompassed stretches of the globe from Australia and India to Canada and America. England helped push the world stage into Industrial Revolution; the Midlands are home to the world's first industrial cities. The land of Chaucer, Shakespeare and Dickens, Saxons, Celts and Normans, is an intriguing and essential journey for anyone interested in the formation of contemporary global culture. For more information on travel to England and other regions in Europe, and discount airfare to England, visit . cfares. com.



    +

    Test Your Feline Felicity

    #1

    1. The Cat Family, or the family Felidae, includes at least 35 species of cats that are similar in physical characteristics. Which is NOT a member of the Cat Family? A. Kodkod B. Margay C. Ocelot D. Fox D. Fox TBD: Did you know that cats are regarded by many biologists as the most highly developed carnivores? 2. Do you know how many breeds of domestic cat there are? A. 20 B. 40 C. 60 D. 80 B. 40 TBD: There are about 40 varieties, or breeds, of domestic cats recognized internationally. 3. Cats became objects of worship in Egypt for what reason? A. The dog was already worshipped by the Assyrians. B. Egyptians worshipped the sun and recognized the cat's affinity for the sun. C. Their ability to keep down the rodent population in Eygpt's economically important grain fields along the Nile. D. Their grace and beauty. C. Their ability to keep down the rodent population in Eygpt's economically important grain fields along the Nile. TBD: A very practical notion. 4. What is the collective name for a group of cats? A. Sleuth B. Murder C. Gang D. Clowder D. Clowder TBD: The other answers are collective names as well. You have a sleuth of bears, a murder of crows, and a gang of elks. 5. Cats are indigenous to all continents except which two? A. Antarctica and Australia B. Eurasia and South America C. Antarctica and North America D. Australia and Eurasia A. Antarctica and Australia TBD: This was new to us, too! 6. Who or what was Bastet? A. The first domestic cat. B. Egyptian cat goddess with the body of a woman and the head of a cat. C. Egyptian goddess of war who was assisted by a magical cat. D. The Egyptian pharaoh who declared that cats were sacred. B. Egyptian cat goddess with the body of a woman and the head of a cat. TBD: She was the goddess of love and fertility. 7. All cats are digitigrade which means they walk on their toes with the back part of the foot raised. Which cats do NOT have claws that are completely retractile? A. Geoffrey's Cat B. Cheetah C. Jaguar D. Little spotted cat B. Cheetah TBD: Actually the Cheetah is the only cat, including all the other large cats, with this distinction. Who knew? 8. Which is NOT a way that the Egyptians used the cat? A. Retriever for birds B. Racing animals C. Object of worship D. Hunting animals B. Racing animals TBD: It was true that cats were trained to retrieve birds brought down by their masters! 9. These breeds are all lacking something, what is it (respectively)? The Manx, Cymric, and Sphynx. A. Tail and hair B. Ears, hair, and tail C. Claws, tail, and hair D. Tail A. Tail and hair TBD: The Sphynx is a hairless cat while the Manx and Cymric are shorthaired and longhaired cats without tails. 10. Which region CANNOT claim a breed of rex? A. Selkirk B. Devonshire C. Wales D. Cornwall C. Wales TBD: There is a Selkirk Rex from Wyoming's Selkirk Mountains, a Devon Rex from Devonshire, England, and a Cornish Rex from Cornwall, England, but no Welsh Rex. 11. What is the scientific classification of the domestic cat? A. Felis catus B. Felis domesticus C. Acinonyx jubatus D. Panthera leo A. Felis catus TBD: That was too easy! By the way, The QuizQueen made Felis domesticus up, Acinonyx jubatus is the cheetah, and Panthera leo is the lion. 12. Which is NOT a characteristic of the cat? A. The ability to taste sweet things B. The ability to hunt in the dark C. Using its sensitive whiskers to sense changes in the environment D. Papillae to clean the flesh from the bones of animal prey A. The ability to taste sweet things TBD: This was new to us, too! 13. Two pigments form the basis for all coat colors in the modern domestic cat. These two pigments may be combined with each other or with white (the absence of pigment). What are the two pigments? A. Black and orange B. Black and white C. Black and blue D. Orange and blue A. Black and orange TBD: Scientists believe the domestic cat's original coat color was probably greyish brown with darker tabby stripes, a color that provides excellent camouflage in a variety of environments. All other coat colors are the result of genetic mutations. 14. How many vocal sounds does a cat have? A. 10 B. 50 C. 100 D. 150 C. 100 TBD: Most dogs have only about 10. 15. When a famous cartoon Cat and Mouse made their debut in 1939, what was the Cat's name? A. Tom B. Jerry C. Jasper D. Morris C. Jasper TBD: In later cartoons, they would become Tom and Jerry, but in Puss Gets the Boot, the feline co star was named Jasper.



    +

    The Freedom Of Travelling In A Camper Van

    #1

    In this article, I am going to write about the joys of going on holiday in a camper van. Owning and travelling around in one of these vans gives people a lot of freedom of where they want to stop to sleep and for how long they want to stay in each destination. Many people from the UK decide to tour parts of Europe over a period of months in one of these type of vehicles. I was recently talking to a neighbour of mine who owns a very impressive camper van which is why I have decided to write this article, his name is John. John and his wife decided to sell their big house when they were in their late fifties and move to a smaller flat. This flat was then going to be their base in the UK to return to when they were not travelling. They had a lot of excess money from selling their old house and buying the new flat and decided to spend part of this money on a very good quality camper van. The plan was then to travel around different parts of the UK as well as visiting other countries in the world. John and his wife have two wonderful dogs which they adore. They have never enjoyed leaving these dogs with friends or in kennels when they have been travelling in the past and now they do not have to, as there is plenty of room of course in the camper van. When talking with John I asked him where he was planning to travel to next. He replied that he was going to drive down to the South West Coast of England. He would tour through parts of Devon and Cornwall stopping for a few days in different areas. I asked him what day he would be returning, he stated that he was not sure and that it would depend on the weather. Maybe one week or four, I am not sure yet Steve, he said. I could not believe his attitude and his lifestyle, I have to say I was very jealous. What freedom, I thought to myself. John then stated that next month he was going to travel to Portugal but that there was no rush to get there. I wish I had started to do this years ago, but what with work it was impossible really, he continued. I also have a dog and would love to have this form of travel freedom. I have spoken to my wife about it and she has said that she would prefer to stop in a hotel. Oh well, I have years before I retire to try to work her around to my way of thinking.



    +

    Celtic Jewelry Is Distinctive And Distinguished

    #1

    Celtic jewelry is like the Celtic countries from which it comes. Celtic jewelry has very distinctive designs and color schemes, and this jewelry looks very distinguished. Celtic is a term that describes the people, language, culture and products from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, the Isle of Man and Cornwall. These countries and people are closely tied to the United Kingdom, but most of these people have very distinctive cultures and languages of their own. The products from the Celtic countries are beautiful, but they have very distinctive features of the culture of their people. Celtic jewelry comes in many different styles and types, but all of these pieces have distinctive characteristics. Most people have seen examples of Celtic jewelry, but do not always know exactly where this jewelry comes from. The diamond engagement rings are available that present the best of Celtic jewelry. Other rings from Celtic collections have much of the mystery that comes with the Celtic character. The rings have designs from pagan rituals, dragonflies, moonstones, spiders and crescent moons. Celtic jewelry is often in sterling silver, but the models are available in gold settings as well. Celtic Jewelry Is Unusually Beautiful The Celtic pendants are complementary to the rings, but these pieces usually have great stories or legends that come with them. The designers use the old Celtic legends when they craft their pieces for the market. A pendant inspired by a story about the children of Lir is inspired by the story from Celtic tradition. The design incorporates symbols from this Celtic story. The swan theme from the story is evident with a careful look at the craftsmanship in this beautiful pendant. The Celtic jewelry is a conversation piece as well as a decoration. There are many different pendants that incorporate symbols inspired by this story Other jewelry designs are inspired by other stories from the Celtic culture and tradition. The designs incorporate the symbols from the culture and traditions into the jewelry in very creative ways. The symbols are not readily apparent so it is very interesting to learn the stories and traditions to understand more of the jewelry. The swan is a very important symbol in one famous story, but this symbol is not obvious in the pieces of jewelry. Usually information about the designs and the stories accompany the pieces of jewelry to inform the buyer about the designs. The information about the origins of the designs usually makes the pieces very special.



    +

    Anthony Fisher Pixies

    #1

    Anthony Fisher Pixies are unique and hand crafted. Based out of Cornwall these pieces have a creative unique look. Not your everyday storybook pixie, Anthony Fisher pixies have a similarity to the artistry of the traditional European fairytales. These pixies are collectors’ items with a wide variety to choose from. Each is just as unique as the name given to them. Take for example “Billy Winks Money Box” a pixie figurine that is sleeping in his log home. Each pixie has a story that goes along with them. For example Billy’s story is that he likes to steal little things from humans just to cause trouble, that by the way is what pixies like to do best. Unfortunately, Billy Winks is a lazy pixie and you can usually find him sleeping. These figurines are perfect for adult or child alike. They can be placed in a child’s room or through out the home. They even make a wonderful addition to any garden. Since the many of the pieces have aspects of nature in them, Anthony Fisher Pixies are a perfect match for the average gardener. Pieces such as Sunflower Sam and anyone from his Naughty Sporting series are a good choice for the garden. Other functional pieces include birdbaths, plant holders and even a welcome to my garden piece. There are other functional pieces for in the home or for use on the patio to entertain as well. These include a wine bottle holder, cooking utensil holder and bookends. All pieces are handmade and have the signature uniqueness only an Anthony Fisher Pixie can carry. When purchasing an Anthony Fisher Pixie be sure that is an officially licensed place that sells them and be sure to ask about a certificate of authenticity. As with all collectibles it is best to make sure that the piece has the certificate of authenticity with out this your collectible is nothing more than a statue. Also the certificate of authenticity proves that your hard earned money was spent on what you intended it to be spent on. All in all Anthony Fisher Pixies are the perfect choice to add a little fantasy to the mundane home. They will add a feeling o warmth fun and fantasy to any location. Pieces are reasonably priced and a person on any budget can find a piece that suits them best. These pieces can be found on internet websites that deal in selling just his pieces or directly through the artist’s own website.



    +

    The Worst Holiday Gifts Ever

    #1

    Ten of the worst holiday gifts you can give to friends and relatives from abroad. 10. Some wacky item of clothing. Something that looked great and was perfectly functional on a sun kissed beach will not have much use during a US Fall or a British autumn. Or summer. It will never be worn, ever. 9. Anything electrical. Our electrical plugs are a certain type and quite unique. Luckily they match our wall sockets, which is more than can be said for the plugs of virtually every other country. And they use a different voltage. In other words, don’t even think about it unless it’s for someone you don’t like. 8. Any music recorded in the native tongue. That song to which you indulged in drunken revelry could, when translated by your foreign friend over a polite dinner, be revealed to be something akin to an end of the pier shocker that could certainly turn the air bleu. 7. Some local currency. There’s always someone who thinks that a few coins with a street value of 27 pence or cents will make the perfect gift “for a child”. Don’t be surprised if they ask you for the same amount in local money instead. The same applies to stamps. 6. Any food that was hot when it was purchased. Believe it or not, people do find a kebab shop in Turkey whose wares simply have to be sampled by the folks at home. Reheated yoghurt is never a good idea. 5. Anything you can get from Wallmart or Asda. You might be surprised that you can buy our local favourites all around the world now. Even Jaffa Cakes and PG Tips are available south of Cornwall, but the sense of wonder doesn’t travel well. Even with a foreign price tag. 4. Something exotic that you hope will add to someone’s special interest. Your uncle’s a wine buff. You buy him some wine from abroad. It cost a pound. He’ll serve it to you next Christmas. 3. A copy of some ancient artefact. Holiday destinations with a historical edge to them, especially Greece, Italy, Mexico and Egypt, churn out these items by the lorryload. They’re vases, statues, mosaics and such like. The owners of the originals buried them – what on earth do you expect anyone to do with them today? 2. Anything from Amsterdam. 1. Anything bought from the airport, especially Duty or Tax Free. Or more accurately, buying something from the airport and then trying to pass it off as a genuine gift from your destination. You’ll fool no one. And contrary to popular belief, this isn’t better than nothing.



    +

     
         
    Essay Service
  • Free Essays Alaska
  • Free Essays Archives
  • Free Essays Arizona
  • Free Essays Arkansas
  • Free Essays australia
  • Free Essays Australia
  • Free Essays California
  • Free Essays Canada
  • Free Essays college
  • Free Essays Colorado
  • Free Essays english
  • Free Essays Florida
  • Free Essays Georgia
  • Free Essays Hawaii
  • Free Essays high school
  • Free Essays Idaho
  • Free Essays Illinois
  • Free Essays India
  • Free Essays Indiana
  • Free Essays Iowa
  • Free Essays Ireland
  • Free Essays Israel
  • Free Essays Kansas
  • Free Essays Kentucky
  • Free Essays Louisiana
  • Free Essays Malaysia
  • Free Essays Massachusetts
  • Free Essays Mississippi
  • Free Essays Missouri
  • Free Essays Montana
  • Free Essays Nebraska
  • Free Essays New Hampshire
  • Free Essays New Zealand
  • Free Essays North Carolina
  • Free Essays North Dakota
  • Free Essays Oklahoma
  • Free Essays online
  • Free Essays read
  • Free Essays Saba
  • Free Essays Sarawak
  • Free Essays Scotland
  • Free Essays Singapore
  • Free Essays Sint Eustatius
  • Free Essays South Africa
  • Free Essays South Carolina
  • Free Essays South Dakota
  • Free Essays students
  • Free Essays Swaziland
  • Free Essays Tennessee
  • Free Essays Texas
  • Free Essays uk
  • Free Essays United Kingdom
  • Free Essays United States of America
  • Free Essays Utah
  • Free Essays Virginia
  • Free Essays Wales
  • Free Essays West Virginia
  • Free Essays Wyoming
  • Free Full Essay
  • Free Narrative Essay
  • Free Online Paper
  • Free online papers
  • Free persuasive essay
  • Free Persuasive Essays
  • Free rewrite essay
  • Insider Essay Archives
  • Online Essay Collection
  • Public Essays Archives
  • Research Archive
  • Review Essay Archives
  • Sample Essays Archives
  • Write My Essay
  •  
    Free Essay
    cnc machining | cnc | laser cutting | router | fishing boat | optimization | search engine optimization | PR marketing | internet marketing | seo research | Social media marketing | SMM | seo architecture | application architecture | internal linking | usability | seo | semantic core | Alcoholics Anonymous | social influence | sentosa | cornwall | holiday cottage | home schooling schedule | home schooling | allergy test | allergy | Fishing in Florida is easy | Fishing | romeo
     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
     
     
      Free Essas